dcsimg


New And Improved

Welcome to the all-different, all-exciting, all-new version of Linux Magazine! No, seriously, it's impossible to pick up this issue and not notice that it's undergone some serious renovation. More specifically, we've given the magazine a complete make-over, and what you hold in your hands is the result of a re-design that we've been working on for several months now.

PUBLISHER’S STATEMENT

New and Improved

by Adam Goodman

Welcome to the all-different, all-exciting, all-new version of Linux Magazine! No, seriously, it’s impossible to pick up this issue and not notice that it’s undergone some serious renovation. More specifically, we’ve given the magazine a complete make-over, and what you hold in your hands is the result of a re-design that we’ve been working on for several months now.

Back in September 2001, the editorial staff decided that the Linux market was continuing to move forward in new and different directions. We felt that if we wanted LM to stay current and relevant, we needed to make a few changes to insure that we would continue to best serve our readers as we track Linux’s growth and evolution.

Some of the changes we decided to make first appeared in the January 2002 issue, where we announced a few modifications to our lineup of monthly columns. But we felt that we needed to do more than just keep our editorial content up-to-date. We also needed to insure that the “look and feel” of LM reflected the growing maturity and mainstream adoption of Linux itself, which meant completely overhauling the magazine’s design.

The re-design project fell into the hands of our Art Director, Christina Empedocles, and the new format you are now looking at is her work. All of us here at LM think she did an incredible job blending the form of LM’s design and the function of LM’s editorial into a spectacular new package.

Meanwhile, the magazine had one other element that the editors felt could use an upgrade, and that was our tagline “The Chronicle of the Revolution”. In our opinion, Linux isn’t really a revolution anymore. While it’s still a very unique animal, and is part of an incredibly exciting and dynamic movement, it’s hard to ignore the fact that Linux has become as mainstream as Unix or Windows. Hardly a day goes by when there isn’t some mention of Linux in the New York Times or the Wall Street Journal. And Linux is regularly stacked up against its mainstream competitors when tech publications conduct an evaluation or when an IT shop asks a vendor to bid on a new system.

So we needed a new tagline that more accurately reflected both where Linux is today, and where LM’s editorial is focused. We decided upon — “Open Source. Open Standards.” — because first, in our thinking, Linux is in many ways a proxy for the entire Open Source movement. At the very least, it’s certainly the most visible Open Source project out there. Our second reason for changing the tagline was that our magazine has always been about much more than just Linux. We’ve always focused on Linux in the context of all the other systems and projects that surround and run on it, and the open standards upon which many of those projects are built. So the new tagline seems to fit our editorial position more accurately than the old one did.

Whew! That’s a lot of change for one issue. But then again, that’s exactly the point, isn’t it? What makes Linux and Open Source so fascinating is the fact that the ecosystem is in a constant state of rapid change, and you can be sure that we’ll always do our best to keep up with that. Please always feel free to send us your thoughts at editors@linux-mag.com. We look forward to hearing what you’ve got to say about the “New and Improved” Linux Magazine.

See you next month,


Adam Signature

Adam M. Goodman


Editor & Publisher





feedback




 

Linux Magazine /
May 2002 / PUBLISHER’S STATEMENT
New and Improved




Fatal error: Call to undefined function aa_author_bios() in /opt/apache/dms/b2b/linux-mag.com/site/www/htdocs/wp-content/themes/linuxmag/single.php on line 62