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We Are Family

On August 11th 1999, Red Hat Software became a publicly traded company. Most of the staff of Linux Magazine were at LinuxWorld Expo at the time of the event, and we were stunned by how well the stock market received Red Hat. The stock shot up from the $14 per share offering price to something in the neighborhood of $52. As I write this, the price is around $70, and the company is, therefore, worth $4.8 billion. Wow.








Pub Statement Oct '99
One MILLION Dollars:(L-R) DavidSifry, David LaDuke, and Art Tyde III from Linuxcare plot evil world domination schemes with LM Publisher Adam Goodman and Editor Robert McMillan.

On August 11th 1999, Red Hat Software became a publicly traded company. Most of the staff of Linux Magazine were at LinuxWorld Expo at the time of the event, and we were stunned by how well the stock market received Red Hat. The stock shot up from the $14 per share offering price to something in the neighborhood of $52. As I write this, the price is around $70, and the company is, therefore, worth $4.8 billion. Wow.

So, overnight, Linux has become a multi-billion dollar industry. On the other hand, I guess it really isn’t such an overnight phenomenon. I mean, aside from the fact that the Linux kernel itself has been actively under development for the last eight years (clearly disqualifying it from “overnight success” status), anyone who attended both LinuxWorld Expos (in March and again in August) could see that some serious money has been getting behind Linux for a while.

This LinuxWorld Expo was really impressive. It literally occupied twice as much floor space as the previous show, and the space was taken up by bigger booths, and many new vendors. Among the traditional hardwarecompanies, Dell and SGI were notable additions to the roster. At the same time, more and more Linux companies continue to pop up as well, and this show was something of a “coming out” event for hardware vendors like Atipa Linux Solutions. VA Linux Systems wins the award for “having a booth so big that you couldn’t walk across the show floor without accidentally stepping into some part of it.”

What most impressed me was not how big things are getting, but the way we seem to be sticking together as a community despite the fact that things are scaling up so fast. The most amazing thing about LinuxWorld is not that companies like IBM, Dell, Compaq, Sun, and SGI are standing up and taking notice, but rather that you can still see Linus and Tove Torvalds walking around the show floor pushing their daughters around in baby carriages. No matter how big things get, no one seems to be forgetting their roots. Speaking of roots, one company that certainly hasn’t forgotten theirs is Linuxcare. We recently had the chance to sit down with the company’s founding trio; Art Tyde, Dave Sifry and Dave LaDuke. The interview (see page 36) was a blast, and really illustrates the fact that no matter how big things might get, Linux, first and foremost, is about having fun and doing what you love.

Basically, the Linux community still feels like one big family. I guess all families have their share of rich uncles. It doesn’t really matter. It’s still a family. See you next month.

Adam Signature

Adam M. Goodman


Editor & Publisher









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Linux Magazine /
October 1999 / PUBLISHER’S STATEMENT
We Are Family




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